scientificvisuals:

Liquid nitrogen in a vacuum. Best explained here. Source here. Seen via IFLS.

Img. 1 is an overview in real time: as pressure drops in the vacuum, liquid nitrogen first boils then freezes.
Img. 2 & 3 show liquid nitrogen boiling.
Img. 4 shows liquid nitrogen freezing.
Img. 5 & 6 show the frozen nitrogen abruptly and quickly restructuring into a more compact configuration, similar to snowflakes.

(via freshphotons)

amnhnyc:

On land, sunlight illuminates a world that’s bright and bursting with color. But in the ocean, light and color diminish as the water gets deeper. Take a look at what happens to light as it moves through the water, and how marine organisms have adapted.
Learn more in our traveling exhibition, Creatures of Light.  

amnhnyc:

On land, sunlight illuminates a world that’s bright and bursting with color. But in the ocean, light and color diminish as the water gets deeper. Take a look at what happens to light as it moves through the water, and how marine organisms have adapted.

Learn more in our traveling exhibition, Creatures of Light.  

(via pyranova)

ucresearch:

More efficient ways to lower CO2


The term carbon capture is talked about as a way to battle against climate change, but what exactly is it?  This recent NY Times video does a great job explaining it.

Basically, when a power plant burns fossil fuel such as coal, it releases gas into the air.  Carbon capture technology can single out the CO2 molecules in this gas before it leaves the smokestack.  The current process is to spray a chemical on the gas to separate the carbon dioxide so that it can be pumped underground.

This process is both expensive and can take up a third of the plant’s generated power known as parasitic energy.  Scientists are trying to find ways to use safer and energy efficient materials to reduce this issue.  The problem is that a wide array (millions!) of chemicals can bond with CO2, making the testing process quite complex.

UC Berkeley’s Berend Smit and his team have created a computer model to test out these materials in the virtual world.  So researchers can upload the molecular structure they want to test to a website and see how efficient it might be.  

You can read more about this project here.

(via science-junkie)

thearbiter:

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(via cheapramen)

666throck:

sickbat:

These are variations of bobtail squid. These tiny creatures live in the pacific and indian oceans within shallow water. They generally measure between 1 and 8cm long. They are usually recognized by their eight short tentacles and rounded shape.


Bobtail squid have a symbiotic relationship with bioluminescent bacteria which inhabit a special light organ in the squid’s mantle. The bacteria are fed a sugar and amino acid solution by the squid and in return hide the squid’s silhouette when viewed from below by matching the amount of light hitting the top of the mantle.

What a wonderful thing nature is.

OH MY GOD

TINY SQUIDDIES

LOOK AT THEM THEY LOOK LIKE LITTLE PSYCHEDELIC JELLYBEANS AAH THE ONE ON THE BOTTOM MIDDLE ALL CURLED UP LIKE A SLEEPY KITTY.

THIS IS THE CUTEST THING I’VE SEEN ON MY DASH ALL WEEK

(via pyranova)

fangamer:

Your Guide to the Creatures of the Kanto Region

In this truly impressive labor of love, Professor karifry succeeded in documenting the 151 creatures of the Kanto Region discovered during a survey in 1998. Her documentations include detailed illustrations and a description for each critter.

The Field Guide to Kanto comes in two forms - paperback and hardback. The hardback version features an embossed cover and a dust jacket that doubles as a poster!

(via pyranova)